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Matt Inman’s 2012 IndieGoGo Adventures! A Teeny Tiny Development Case Study for a Brief Tuesday Evening Lull August 21, 2012

Filed under: Observations,Philanthropy — Kristin Eline @ 4:53 pm
Tags: , , ,

So, I’m not sure if you have been keeping up with this guy, but these campaigns are QUITE successful.

This is not a serious development guy. He’s not working for any of the organizations for which he is raising money. He is simply tapping his (immense) network. And he is apparently doing it well.

The majority of his Facebook followers, I would say, are young-ish…ranging from (I estimate here) early 20’s to late 30’s. His career is artist/comedian…he draws comics. You may or may not have seem some of his more hilarious grammar-centric cartoons.

Ten Words You Need to Stop Misspelling
How To Use An Apostrophe
How To Use A Semicolon

So so funny….but I digress…

In the last few months, he has designed two fund-raising campaigns on IndieGoGo that have seen TREMENDOUS success in a VERY short period of time. Viral development.

You can read more his most recent campaign if you haven’t heard about it, yet:

http://www.indiegogo.com/teslamuseum 

This campaign, with a goal of raising $850,000 in 45 days, was made to help match a federal grant challenge to purchase Tesla’s old laboratory/land on which a non-profit is going to build a Tesla/science/energy museum of sorts.

This guy raised $877k+ in 6 days.

SIX. DAYS. 

I broke down gift size choices by number of people who supposedly donated at those levels (something to keep in mind is that on the donation page, you are given the option to change your gift amount to something other than the increments given…so one may need to account for that) and here is what I got:

$3 Donations (2,290 people) = $6,870                      < 1% of total

$25 Donations (4,076 people) = $101,900               11.6% of total

$33 Donations (2,383 people) = $78,639                 9% of total

$50 Donations (3,400 people) = $170,000               19.4% of total

$100 Donations (1,001 people) = $100,100            11.4% of total

$333 Donations (141 people) = $46,953                 5.4% of total l

$500 Donations (50 people) = $25,000                    2.9% of total

$1,000 Donations (40 people) = $40,000                 4.6% of total

$2,500 Donations (6 people) = $15,000                   1.7% of total

$3,333 Donations (3 people) = $9,999                     1% of total

$33,333 Donations (2 people) = $66,666               7.6% of total

Total # of Donors: 13,392

About 25% of the total amount raised looks like it came from increased gifts from the increment levels given. It was very tempting to up a $33 to $40 at check out. Something to think about…If all 2,383 people who supposedly gave at a $33 level upped their gift by just $7…that would mean an additional $16,681 towards the campaign. His reasoning behind the $33 increment made perfect sense…but as a donor, I felt torn – like when I  hear most of a song but the last note is left off and I can’t help but sing it out loud anyway to feel the completion. And $7 is just $7. Right?

Some people are purists. Some people like roundness. $40 is quite round.

98% of the donors (based on these increments – not accounting for hidden gift increases) gave $100 or less.

The Oatmeal’s FB page has 694,509 followers. The artist’s personal FB page seems to be hidden from public searches, but I imagine he has maybe 200-500 friends there, and has advertised his campaign on there (based on the avg. number of FB friends on any given personal page).

His website averages 7 million unique visitors and 30 million page views. In the 3 years TheOatmeal.com has been online it has been read by over 100 million people and received nearly 1 billion page views.

 

Fascinates the heck outta me.

What other patterns can you find?! 🙂

[PLEASE let me know if I switched up some numbers in the math…I do that sometimes] 😉

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